pulitzercenter
pulitzercenter:

LUSAKA, Zambia — In his spare bungalow in central Lusaka, Fisho Mwale wears a pastel, plaid button-down and sleek, rectangular glasses. He is warm and soft-spoken. But his easy manner is camouflage; Mwale is calculating, as any man who has been both distinguished and underestimated might be.
The son of a soccer star who became foreign minister, Mwale was, for a few years, mayor of Lusaka, Zambia’s capital. One of his early business ventures was buying a London-based trade-financing company. “It was an Anglo-American corporation,” he says. “And here were these small, cheeky Africans.” The acquisition reversed the usual flow of purchasing power, from global north to south. Which is to say, Mwale is proud.
Mwale keeps his facial hair narrow and closely cropped. He wears the same goatee in a favorite old photograph, in which he and several associates revel in the high-rolling lifestyle of the early debt-swapping business, a small slice of global financing that would bring Mwale fortune and frustration.
Twenty years after the photo was taken, outrage over a deal Mwale executed for (or with, depending on whom you ask) American financier Michael Sheehan drove Mwale out of Zambia. Allegations swirled that Mwale had bribed officials to push the deal through.
The deal that Mwale helped execute made Sheehan the best-known of a small group of men who head “vulture funds” — or, as the industry prefers to call them, distressed-debt investments. These are purchases, by private investors, of sovereign debt that’s gone long unpaid. Investors say they want to “swap” that debt for local investment; critics say vultures buy debt cheaply only to sue later for much more money.
Activists and human-rights crusaders see this, essentially, as stealing from the poor to get rich, and using courts to do it. But financiers who deal in vulture funds argue that their lawsuits force accountability for national borrowing, without which credit markets would shrivel, and that their pursuit of unpaid commercial debt uncovers public corruption.

Read the rest of Jina Moore’s article, her first in her project: Zambia: Twilight of the Vulture Funds?

pulitzercenter:

LUSAKA, Zambia — In his spare bungalow in central Lusaka, Fisho Mwale wears a pastel, plaid button-down and sleek, rectangular glasses. He is warm and soft-spoken. But his easy manner is camouflage; Mwale is calculating, as any man who has been both distinguished and underestimated might be.

The son of a soccer star who became foreign minister, Mwale was, for a few years, mayor of Lusaka, Zambia’s capital. One of his early business ventures was buying a London-based trade-financing company. “It was an Anglo-American corporation,” he says. “And here were these small, cheeky Africans.” The acquisition reversed the usual flow of purchasing power, from global north to south. Which is to say, Mwale is proud.

Mwale keeps his facial hair narrow and closely cropped. He wears the same goatee in a favorite old photograph, in which he and several associates revel in the high-rolling lifestyle of the early debt-swapping business, a small slice of global financing that would bring Mwale fortune and frustration.

Twenty years after the photo was taken, outrage over a deal Mwale executed for (or with, depending on whom you ask) American financier Michael Sheehan drove Mwale out of Zambia. Allegations swirled that Mwale had bribed officials to push the deal through.

The deal that Mwale helped execute made Sheehan the best-known of a small group of men who head “vulture funds” — or, as the industry prefers to call them, distressed-debt investments. These are purchases, by private investors, of sovereign debt that’s gone long unpaid. Investors say they want to “swap” that debt for local investment; critics say vultures buy debt cheaply only to sue later for much more money.

Activists and human-rights crusaders see this, essentially, as stealing from the poor to get rich, and using courts to do it. But financiers who deal in vulture funds argue that their lawsuits force accountability for national borrowing, without which credit markets would shrivel, and that their pursuit of unpaid commercial debt uncovers public corruption.

Read the rest of Jina Moore’s article, her first in her project: Zambia: Twilight of the Vulture Funds?

christianam
At the core of Jesus’ life and message was a commitment to love. Not love in the casual feeble use of the word, but a relentless love consistently backed by action, underpinned by social justice and cloaked in mercy. This mystifying and unfathomable love was crystallized by a radical love act - death on the cross. The immensity and intensity of this sacrifice is mind-blowing. Today I am grateful for the love that transforms and fills the gaps. A love that’s willing to dive into darkness, pull you from the brink of despair and upwards into the light, setting your feet on the cliff of new possibilities. A love the heals the fractured and brings wholeness to what would otherwise be incomplete. Some of us have encountered this love through faith, others through family and friends. Some moved viscerally by song and others stand amazed by nature. The beauty of life is the privilege of experiencing love in different places and spaces. Today I am grateful for love, grateful for the cross and grateful for Good Friday - a day where we can all love again - Christiana Mbakwe
(via christianam)

Thank you 👏👍

dynamicafrica

dynamicafrica:

Stella Jean Releases her Spring/Summer 2014 Lookbook.

Visually and conceptually, Haitian-Italian designer Stella Jean never disappoints. The presentation of her garments and the looks she creates are always fresh, flirty and incredibly fun. Each one of her collections carry an aura about them that’s both classic and timeless. And of course, aside from the designer’s heritage, wax prints, ankara textiles, bold patterns and colours all remain permanent fixtures in her designs - something her latest lookbook confirms yet again.

The one change that would be lovely to see, however, would be the use of black models in her lookbooks.

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All Africa, All the time.

Wish i could get something from this stunning collection.

exquisiteblackpeople

lonelyy-depressed-girl:

if I offered you $20, would you take it?

How about if I crumpled it up?

Stepped on it?

you would probably take it even though it was crumpled and stepped on it. Do you know why?

Because it is still $20, and its worth has not changed.

The same goes for you; if you have a bad day, or if something bad happens to you, you are not worthless.

if someone crumples you up or steps on you, your worth does not change. You are still just as valuable as you were before.